When at Home: Foreign Language

When at home: Foreign Language Audio learning

Ah, summer is almost gone! Yes, we travel a lot, but in reality school season has set in and there’s nothing we can do about it! My little boy is at home with me, and he is constantly asking me, “A donde bas?” “A donde bas usted?” He just naturally expects to be on the road, going somewhere! He’s learning some Spanish phrases because I finally figured out the best way to incorporate foreign language into our home is to listen to interactive audio CDs. I always had musical CDs in Spanish when they were babies, but now I really felt comfortable putting on the Pimsleur Approach Spanish. The best time to play it I find, is when I’m making meals, because that can get so boring and time-consuming– especially for a preschooler. Pimsleur can be expensive, but here is the version I use available on Amazon: Pimsleur Approach Spanish 1. I’m at level two, but that’s O.K. Sometimes I put on what the kids need and sometimes I put on my what I need. During meal prep, while he’s playing or while I’m doing puzzles with him;during dinner prep while my daughter can hear it too, and of course, on the open road!

I love that it’s interactive and that my mind is trying to get the answer before they say it on the CD. It is designed to just listen and repeat. It’s also designed to constantly refresh vocabulary just at the scientifically proven moment that your mind starts to lose its retention. The more times you hear a word, the longer you can remember it; each time gets incrementally longer and the Pimsleur designers have that all figured out! Here is an Amazon page showing the different varieties of Pimsleur studies that are available: Shop my Amazon links

I really believe in giving them potential to become fluent in another language while they are young. For a long time I obsessed about just doing one language, but through thrift stores and garage sales I have gradually acquired Chinese, French, Italian and other languages– there’s nothing wrong with giving them a sampling of multiple languages, and if you have babies still, it has been proven that they can learn to speak without an accent if you introduce it before the age of 16 months! I love the idea of learning it on the go– because my kids and I are too busy to be able to sit down and focus in front of workbooks right now.

When it comes to books, you may like the Usborne First Thousand Words books– each book has the same cute pictures and themes but they come in different languages. Help them learn their first thousand words easily and reinforce what you are doing audibly with Pimsleur. Here is my Usborne link: First Thousand Words

On my children’s book:

When I decided to blog a book, I knew I would never complete it without the pressure keep writing– which comes from having to post two to three times per week. Just read this quote from “The Weekend Book Proposal” by Ryan G. Van Cleave: “Ideas are cheap. A good idea handled poorly in writing isn’t publishable. A boring idea handled wonderfully in writing might well be publishable. It might even be a bestseller. Until you develop your idea on the page, you’ll never know if it’ll work or not as a written text.” That is my reason to keep blogging: to figure out whether it will work or not! Thanks for being patient and supportive of my blog as I figure it all out!

Children’s Literature: Chapter 6: Memories

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As they sat down at the outdoor cafe to eat lunch, Sophia pulled out a notebook and began writing. “Mamma,” she said, “I’m writing down things I remember. My scrapbooks helped, and even my dreams last night helped me remember places I’ve been. It was so fun looking at the scrapbooks with you yesterday!”

“I remember eating outdoors at a cafe like this when we lived out West. Daddy did a painting of me outside the little ice cream shop there. And we went to a children’s store nearby where we got little purple and yellow boots for me. You even wrote something in the scrapbook about those shoes being from France. And I remember that little French girl wearing a beret. She had to have been the owner of my old shoes– she must have brought them to the consignment store. After all, they were French shoes. I remember playing with her and looking at musical instruments at one of the stores. And eating ice cream outside with her. Her mom was looking at Daddy’s art work.”

“Hmm… all those memories are from when Daddy worked in Pullman, Washington. I think you remember more than I do,” Mamma said. “Or you are just imagining it. But I was three when my parents took me to France on a business trip, and I remember a lot too.” Mamma said

“You’ll have to tell me all about it,” Sophia said. “I want to write a story about the little French girl, so I need to know more about France!”

“What about Italy?” Mamma asked?

“It’s just like you said, Mamma. I need to start with something familiar. You were in France, and I got to meet a girl from France. There’s a story here and I am going to write it!”